Bird Families

Campylorhynchus humilis

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List of Birds of Costa Rica Part 8 From Piha to Mockingbird

I continue to show the Sparrow Birds.
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PASSERIFORMES - Cotingidae
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197 (1175) Rufous Piha (Rufous Piha, Lipaugus unirufus unirufus)

On November 10, one bird at Carara National Park (Quebrada Ganado, Puntarenas).



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PASSERIFORMES - Pipridae
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198 (1176) Collar short-winged manakin (White-collared Manakin, Manacus candei)

On 2 November, several birds were seen at La Selva biological Station (Puerto Viejo de Sarapiqui, Heredia).


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199 (1177) Ringed short-winged manakin (Orange-collared Manakin, Manacus aurantiacus)

Endemic to Costa Rica and western Panama.

On November 8, one male was seen at the Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (Piedras Blancas National Park, La Gamba, Golfito, Puntarenas Province).


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200 (1178) Blue-crowned Manakin, Lepidothrix coronata velutina)

On November 8, one female on a forest trail at Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (Piedras Blancas National Park, La Gamba, Golfito, Puntarenas Province).
10 November, one female at Carara National Park (Quebrada Ganado, Puntarenas).


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PASSERIFORMES - Tityridae
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201 (1179) (Sulfur-rumped Myiobius, Myiobius sulphureipygius aureatus)

Seen on a forest trail at Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (Piedras Blancas National Park, La Gamba, Golfito, Puntarenas Province) on 8 November.


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202 (1180) Black-crowned Tityra, Tityra inquisitor fraserii)

Photographed the female in La Ensenada Lodge (La Ensenada Wildlife Refuge, Puntarenas) on October 28.


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203 Masked Tityra, Tityra semifasciata costaricensis)

On November 3, we met on the territory of Rancho Naturalista (Turrialba, Caribbean slope in the Cordillera Talamanca).
On November 9, one bird perches on a dry tree off the Road Gamba - Jaco.
Sighted on a boat trip on the Tarcoles River (Puntarenas) on 10 November.


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204 Brown Beckard (Cinnamon Becard, Pachyramphus cinnamomeus fulvidior)

Seen in mixed flock in Mistico Arenal Hanging Bridges Park (La Fortuna, Alajuela) on 29 October.
On November 2, we met at La Selva biological Station (Puerto Viejo de Sarapiqui, Heredia).


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205 (1181) Rose-throated Becard, Pachyramphus aglaiae latirostris)

Synonym: Big Beckard

Saw a female at La Ensenada Wildlife Refuge, Puntarenas on 28 October.
Seen on a forest trail at Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (Piedras Blancas National Park, La Gamba, Golfito, Puntarenas Province) on 8 November.
10 November, one female at Carara National Park (Quebrada Ganado, Puntarenas).
A female was seen on a boat trip on the Tarcoles River (Puntarenas) on 10 November.


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PASSERIFORMES - Vireonidae
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206 (1182) Yellow-winged Vireo, Vireo carmioli)

Endemic to Costa Rica and western Panama.

Photographed at Savegre Mountain Lodge (San Gerardo de Dota, Provincia de San Jose) on November 7.


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207 Red-eyed Vireo, Vireo olivaceus olivaceus)

On November 2, we met at La Selva biological Station (Puerto Viejo de Sarapiqui, Heredia).


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PASSERIFORMES - Corvidae
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208 Brown Jay Psilorhinus morio morio)

On October 25 and 26, we met groups of birds at the Hotel Buena Vista, Alajuela.
On October 29 and 30, flocks of up to 10 birds at the Arenal Observatory Lodge (La Fortuna, Alajuela).
Sighted at Rancho Naturalista (Turrialba, Caribbean slope in the Cordillera Talamanca) on 3 November.
Sighted at the Tarcoles River (Puntarenas) on 10 November.


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209 White-throated Magpie-Jay, Calocitta formosa pompata)

From 26 to 28 October, a flock of birds demanded bread from guests at La Ensenada Wildlife Refuge, Puntarenas.


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PASSERIFORMES - Ptiliogonatidae
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210 (1183) Black-and-yellow silky flycatcher (Black-and-yellow Phainoptila, Phainoptila melanoxantha melanoxantha)

Synonym: Black-and-yellow Silky-flycatcher.

Endemic to Costa Rica and western Panama.

On November 5, a short meeting with a male near the Paraiso Quetzal Lodge restaurant (Cerro de la Muerte, San Gerardo de Dota, San Jose).


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211 (1184) Long-tailed Silky-flycatcher, Ptiliogonys caudatus)

Synonym: Long-tailed Silk Waxwing

Endemic to Costa Rica and Panama.

On 31 October, a flock of birds was seen feeding in the forest on the trail at Bosque de Paz Lodge (Bajo del Toro, Alajuela).


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PASSERIFORMES - Hirundinidae
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212 (1185) Mangrove Swallow ( Tachycineta albilinea)

On 10 November, several birds were resting on islets in the middle of the river near the bridge over the Tarcoles River (Puntarenas).
A lot during boat trips on the river.


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213 Gray-breasted Martin Progne chalybea chalybea)

On November 8, we met near Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (Piedras Blancas National Park, La Gamba, Golfito, Puntarenas Province).


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214 (1186) Patagonian swallow (Blue-and-white Swallow, Notiochelidon cyanoleuca cyanoleuca)

Synonym: Pygochelidon cyanoleuca.

On the evening of October 30 and 31, many birds flew and sat on a wire at the Bosque de Paz Lodge (Bajo del Toro, Alajuela).
For the night, all the birds sat under the eaves near the door to our room.
On November 5, we met at the Tropical Center (C.A.T.I.E., Turrialba). The birds were resting on the wires.


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215 Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Stelgidopteryx serripennis)

In Costa Rica, swallows of the following subspecies meet during the winter: S. s. serripennis and S. s. psammochroa, nests S. s. fulvipennis.

On October 26 and 27, we met at La Ensenada Lodge (La Ensenada Wildlife Refuge, Puntarenas).
Seen on wires at the Tropical Center (C.A.T.I.E., Turrialba) on 5 November.


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216 Southern Rough-winged Swallow Stelgidopteryx ruficollis)

AND Stelgidopteryx ruficollis uropygialis

Seen on wires en route to Arenal Observatory Lodge (La Fortuna, Alajuela) on 29 October.
Seen on steam pipes at the Tropical Center (C.A.T.I.E., Turrialba) on 5 November.

B Stelgidopteryx ruficollis decolor

On November 10, we met during a boat trip on the Tarcoles River, Puntarenas.


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PASSERIFORMES - Troglodytidae
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217 (1187) Tiger Wren (Band-backed Wren, Campylorhynchus zonatus costaricensis)

Synonym: Tiger cactus wren.

On 2 November, several colored-ringed birds at La Selva Biological Station (Puerto Viejo de Sarapiqui, Heredia).
The female collected nesting material.


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218 Rufous-backed Wren, Campylorhynchus capistratus capistratus)

Extracted from Campylorhynchus rufinucha (Vazquez-Miranda et al 2009).

From 26 to 28 October we met at La Ensenada Lodge (La Ensenada Wildlife Refuge, Puntarenas).
On October 28, one bird in the city of Limonal (Guanacaste).
From 9 to 14 November are common at the Punta Leona Hotel & Club (Jaco, Puntarenas Province).


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219 (1188) Salvin's bush wren (Riverside Wren, Cantorchilus semibadius)

Synonyms: Salvin's Wren, Pheugopedius semibadius, Thryothorus nigricapillus semibadius, Thryothorus semibadius

Endemic to Costa Rica and western Panama.

Seen on the forest trail at Esquinas Rainforest Lodge and at the lodge (Piedras Blancas National Park, La Gamba, Golfito, Puntarenas Province) on 8 November.


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220 (1189) Stripe-breasted Wren, Cantorchilus thoracicus)

Synonym: Thryothorus thoracicus.

Endemic to Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama.

On October 29, we were often seen while walking through the woods at Mistico Arenal Hanging Bridges Park (La Fortuna, Alajuela).


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221 House Wren (House Wren, Troglodytes aedon intermedius)

Synonym: Troglodytes musculus intermedius.

Some taxonomists divide this species into several, in the latter case it is Troglodytes musculus intermedius.

Seen on the grounds at the Arenal Observatory Lodge (La Fortuna, Alajuela) on 30 October.
On October 31, we met at the Bosque de Paz Lodge (Bajo del Toro, Alajuela).
On November 7, we met at Esquinas Rainforest Lodge (Piedras Blancas National Park, La Gamba, Golfito, Puntarenas Province).
From November 11 to November 14, I sometimes saw on the territory of the Punta Leona Hotel & Club (Jaco, Puntarenas Province).


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Mountain wren (Timberline Wren, Thryorchilus browni)

Endemic to Costa Rica and western Panama.

On November 7, we heard and briefly saw in paramos at an altitude of 3300 m num (Carretera Interamericana, near Siberia, Provincia de San Jose).
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222 (1169) Gray-breasted Wood Wren, Henicorhina leucophrys collina)

On October 31st, only heard in the forest on the trail at Bosque de Paz Lodge (Bajo del Toro, Alajuela).
Sighted at Savegre Mountain Lodge (San Gerardo de Dota, Provincia de San Jose) on 5 November.


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PASSERIFORMES - Polioptilidae
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Long-billed Gnatwren, Ramphocaenus melanurus rufiventris)

On October 29, only heard in the woods at Mistico Arenal Hanging Bridges Park (La Fortuna, Alajuela).
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223 White-lored Gnatcatcher, Polioptila albiloris albiloris)

A flock of birds on the coast at La Ensenada Lodge (La Ensenada Wildlife Refuge, Puntarenas) October 28.


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PASSERIFORMES - Mimidae
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Mockingbird (Gray Catbird, Dumetella carolinensis)

On November 2, a bird was seen in the distance in the rain at La Selva biological Station (Puerto Viejo de Sarapiqui, Heredia). Without photo.
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Recommended Citation

Bradley, D. W. and D. J. Mennill (2020). Rufous-naped Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha), version 1.0. In Birds of the World (T. S. Schulenberg, Editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.2173/bow.runwre1.01

Authors

David W. Bradley and Daniel J. Mennill

Recommended Citation

Bradley, D. W. and D. J. Mennill (2020). Rufous-naped Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha), version 1.0. In Birds of the World (T. S. Schulenberg, Editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.2173/bow.runwre1.01

Neotropical Birds

Version 1.0

Authors

David W. Bradley and Daniel J. Mennill

Tips for caring for a hamerops at home

    Lighting. Most of all, a fan palm is suitable for a room in the southern location, since the plant is not afraid of direct sunlight. But in this case, frequent ventilation is needed so that overheating does not happen.

Growing temperature hamerops in the spring-summer period should be 22-26 degrees, but if it grows, then frequent spraying of the foliage and airing of the room will be required. In winter, it is recommended to reduce heat indicators to 6-12 degrees, to create winter recreation.

Air humidity should be high when grown. It is recommended not only to spray the leaf plates from a spray bottle with soft and warm water, but also to regularly wipe the leaves with a soft, damp sponge. However, in the autumn-winter period, such operations are stopped if the temperature of the content is low.

Watering the hamerops. With the onset of spring and throughout the summer, abundant soil moisture is recommended for the palm tree. But the slightly dried topsoil acts as a guideline for irrigation. With the arrival of autumn, it is recommended to reduce the frequency of humidification, especially if the plant will be in a cool room or exposed to a draft during the winter months. Chamaerops will be able to survive even a small drying out of an earthen coma, while the bay will immediately negatively affect it. But here it is also important not to "go too far", because if the soil in the pot dries out, the plant may die. It is also necessary to ensure that no water remains in the pot holder from irrigation. Only soft and warm water is used; rainwater, distilled or bottled water can be used.

Fertilizers. For the fan palm, it is recommended to apply top dressing from the beginning of spring days until September, when it is undergoing the process of vegetative activity. It is recommended to apply complex mineral fertilizers intended for palms with a frequency of once every 7 days. If during the winter months chamaerops is kept in a well-lit room, then they do not stop feeding it at this time, adjusting the frequency of introducing drugs once every 1–1.5 months.

  • Transplant and recommendations for soil selection. When the hamerops is still young, the pot and soil are changed every 2-3 years. But if the palm tree becomes large, then the transplant is carried out only as needed (about once every 4-6 years). The time for transplanting is in the spring, but you can also carry out this procedure when the flowering process is completed (in summer). The root shoots of the plant are quite tender and should be transplanted using the transshipment method, that is, without destroying the earthen lump. The pot is selected most of all 4-5 cm in diameter. Since waterlogging of the soil is a greater problem for the plant than drying out, a drainage layer is laid on the bottom of the new container.

  • Since in nature, hamerops settles on rocky and sandy soils, a substrate that is too heavy and wet will not work for it. You can use ready-made commercial soil mixtures intended for palms or compose them yourself from sod, compost, humus soil, coarse sand, while the volume of each of the components should be equal. Experienced flower growers recommend mixing crushed charcoal into such a substrate. As the chamaerops mature, some of the sand should become less and less, and heavy (loamy) sod soil is introduced into the composition.

    Recommendations for breeding hamerops - transplanting shoots and growing from seeds

    To get a new plant of a low-growing palm, you should sow its seeds or separate the root shoots during transplantation.

    For seed reproduction, it is recommended to place the material in warm water for five days. Then the seeds are planted, and the planting depth should be equal to the size of the chamaerops seed. It is necessary to pour a substrate consisting of turf, compost, humus and river sand into the pots. But before pouring soil into the container, it is imperative to lay a drainage layer, since the plant suffers greatly from waterlogging, and the fragile roots of the seedlings may suffer.

    Hamerops seeds are germinated at a temperature not less than 22 degrees and it is recommended to provide bottom heating of the soil. Seedling germination is slow, only after 1–4 months the first shoots can be seen. But the appearance of the palms for the first 2-3 years will not at all resemble beautiful fan outlines. Only after the specified period the foliage will become fluffy, usually this occurs on the 7-10th leaf plate. For the successful cultivation of such a palm tree from seeds, it is important to maintain the thermometer readings in the range of 25-30 units and once every 7 days to carry out fertilizing with mineral preparations.

    Hamerops is distinguished by the property of forming basal processes. However, you should be careful here, since those shoots that come from the root are suitable - the lateral ones are not suitable for vegetative propagation. But if shoots are identified at the root, then you should not rush to immediately separate them from the mother plant. It is necessary to wait until they have well-developed roots. To do this, it is recommended to lay chopped and then moistened sphagnum moss at the base of the palm tree. It is necessary to keep it constantly moist for some time, which will stimulate the growth of the root system. And when the shoots of the chamaerops palm have formed a sufficient number of roots (with a length of at least 2-3 cm), when the mother palm is transplanted, it is separated and planted in pots with a selected substrate and drainage.

    Difficulties arising in the process of home growing hamerops

    Although this undersized palm tree has rather resistant properties in relation to harmful insects, but with constant non-compliance with the rules of maintenance, it can be affected by spider mites, scale insects or mealybugs. If symptoms of pests are detected, it is recommended to spray with insecticides.

    If the owner cannot adjust the irrigation regime for the hamerops, then due to waterlogging of the soil, the root system may begin to rot, and brown spots are also formed on the leaf plates.

    Curious notes about hamerops, photo of a palm tree

    The properties of the hamerops have long been familiar to the inhabitants of the areas in which it grows. It was customary to make ropes and cords from its leaves, as well as fabric for sacks. The tough fibers that cover the stems of the plant are used to make stuffing for mattresses and pillows. When the foliage takes on an adult shape, then rugs, baskets and panicles (various household utensils) are made from it. The young leaves of the master are first impregnated with sulfur, this process will give them softness, and then used to make products. Moreover, this work is considered quite delicate, almost jewelry.

    The fruits of this fan palm are not used for food, but they have long been known to folk healers because of their high tannin content, as well as a bitter taste, which provide astringent action.

    The plant is in close "kinship" with a genus that grows in Asia and bears the name Trachicarpus, but chamaerops differs from it in the possession of thorns-thorns on leaf cuttings, as well as the presence of several thin trunks.

    Like any other palm tree, if hamerops is grown indoors, it will help purify the air, collect dust on its leaves and enrich the microclimate with life-giving oxygen. It has been noticed that if such a plant is regularly and abundantly watered, then it begins to give moisture back into the air through the surface of the leaves, therefore there is always high humidity around.

    By the way, the palm tree responds best to the owner born under the constellation Capricorn (from December 22 to January 20). Since this star sign is the 3rd of the terrestrial ones (except for him, Taurus and Virgo are included in this group), it is considered the most restrained. And since the constellation is under the rule of Saturn, he bestowed his sign with strict outlines, stability, and it is because of this that many plants that are suitable for Capricorn have a strong straight stem.

    It is the hamerops that is one of those representatives of the flora that help the owner born under this constellation to acquire stability on the path of life, stability and peace of mind. Also, chamaerops "assists" in promotion, due to the fact that it has the ability to attract energy from the surrounding space, which will help to acquire the abilities of both the administrator and the organizer. Therefore, the fan palm serves as a talisman for people holding the position of a leader or for those who want to climb the career ladder.

    For everything you need to know about growing a hamerops, see the video below:

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